This blog is for educators, academicians, students and those who are interasted to integrate technology in class room.

A massive open online course (MOOC) is a model for delivering learning content online to any person who wants to take a course, with no limit on attendance. There are many platform available, which are offering free MOOC courses from world class universities and institutes. A MOOC throws open the doors of a course and invites anyone to enter, resulting in a new learning dynamic, one that offers remarkable collaborative and conversational opportunities for students to gather and discuss the course content.For the independent, lifelong learner, the MOOC presents a new opportunity to be part of a learning community, often led by key voices in education.

Following are the upcoming  MOOC courses that every faculty should enroll and learn.

(1)Instructional Design for Mobile Learning:

https://www.canvas.net/courses/instructional-design-for-mobile-learning

Full course description

This course introduces participants to instructional design principles for teaching with mobile technology. Mobile technology is a growing and powerful trend; people now spend more time on mobile apps than they do on the Web. What opportunities does this powerful trend present to those who design online learning? How can we leverage mobile technology in ways that make sense for our teaching methods and student learning?

To answer these questions, participants will explore principles for designing mobile learning; pedagogies for teaching with mobile technology; and tools for creating mobile instruction. Participants will also have the opportunity to attend webinars facilitated by mobile learning experts Dr. Jackie Gerstein, Dr. David Metcalf, and Michelle Pacansky-Brock. By the end of the course, participants should be able to determine how to leverage and integrate mobile technology in their own online courses.

(2)Learning Analytics and Knowledge:

https://www.canvas.net/courses/learning-analytics-and-knowledge

Full course description

This course will provide a generally non-technical introduction to learning analytics and how they are being deployed in various contexts in the education field. Additionally, the tools and methods, ethics and privacy, and systemic impact of analytics will be explored, presenting a broad overview of the current state and possible future directions of the field.

Capturing and analyzing data has changed how decisions are made and resources are allocated in the fields of business, journalism, government, military, and intelligence. Through better use of data, leaders are able to plan and enact strategies with greater clarity and confidence. Data is a value point that drives increased organizational efficiency and a competitive advantage. Analytics provide new insight and actionable intelligence. Companies such as Microsoft, IBM, Google, and Amazon are investing heavily in technologies and techniques to help individuals and organizations make sense of and unlock the value within big data.

In education, the use of data and analytics to improve learning is referred to as learning analytics. Software companies, researchers, educators, and university leaders are starting to recognize the value of data in improving not only teaching and learning, but the entire education industry. The growth of online learning and open online courses generates new sources of data for researchers and educators to better understand the learning experience.

(3)Academia and the MOOC:

https://www.canvas.net/courses/academia-and-the-mooc

Full course description

The New York Times said 2012 was “the year of the MOOC” and EDUCAUSE said MOOCs have “the potential to alter the relationship between learner and instructor and between academe and the wider community.” Many elite universities are offering Massive Open Online Courses, but most colleges and educators are unsure about what MOOCs are and if they are worthwhile.

Can an “open” course offered at no cost to a very large number of participants who receive no institutional credit be a worthwhile venture for a college? And can a course be effective if participants and course materials are distributed across the Web?

In this class, we will briefly cover the history and development of MOOCs. Participants will engage in discussions about why institutions offer these courses, and the possible benefits to both schools and students. This four-week course will examine MOOCs from four perspectives: as a designer building a course, as an instructor, as a student, and as an institution offering and supporting a course.

More courses can be found at ” https://www.canvas.net/

(4)Creativity, Innovation, and Change:

https://www.coursera.org/course/cic

About the Course

This course empowers learners to develop their creative human potential to improve, enhance, and transform  their businesses, communities, and personal lives. Processes like Intelligent Fast Failure will teach you rapid prototyping skills, while the Adaption-Innovation creative style spectrum will help you understand how and why your ideas are unique – and how you can work better with others to solve complex problems.Personal reflection tools like CENTER add a character development dimension to the course that is an important first step towards unlocking your creative potential. Along the way, you will engage with a rich set of tools, exercises, and metrics in order to understand these concepts and how they impact the development of your creative life and career.

(5)Globalizing Higher Education and Research for the ‘Knowledge Economy’:

https://www.coursera.org/course/globalhighered

About the Course

Universities, and higher education systems worldwide, are being transformed by new or changing practices, programs, policies, and agendas. From notions of ‘global competency’ and the ‘global engineer,’ through to ever more common perceptions that international collaborative research is a desirable objective, through to the phenomena of bibliometrics, rankings and benchmarking that work at a global scale, contexts are changing.

This course is designed to help students better understand the complex and rapidly changing nature of higher education and research in a globalizing era. A complementary objective is to experiment with the MOOC platform and assess how well it works to support international collaborative teaching and service. We decided to participate in this initiative to engage in some ‘learning while doing’ that will build on our experiences in international collaborative research, advising, and teaching, as well as Kris’ experience at UW-Madison with a relative new online course (Geography 340 – World Regions in Global Context).

Professors Olds and Robertson began collaborating via a Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) exchange scheme in the mid-2000s. The University of Bristol and University of Wisconsin-Madison are both members of the WUN. We very much look forward to engaging with you about this topic.

(6)Fundamentals of Online Education: Planning and Application:

https://www.coursera.org/course/foe

About the Course

In this course you will learn about the fundamentals of online education. The emphasis will be on planning and application. In the planning phase, you will explore online learning pedagogy, online course design,privacy and copyright issues, online assessments, managing an online class, web tools and Learning Management Systems. In the application phase, you will create online learning materials. The final project for the course will consist of you building an online course based on everything that you learned and created in the course.

(7)E-learning and Digital Cultures:

https://www.coursera.org/course/edc

E-learning and Digital Cultures is aimed at teachers, learning technologists, and people with a general interest in education who want to deepen their understanding of what it means to teach and learn in the digital age. The course is about how digital cultures intersect with learning cultures online, and how our ideas about online education are shaped through “narratives”, or big stories, about the relationship between people and technology. We’ll explore some of the most engaging perspectives on digital culture in its popular and academic forms, and we’ll consider how our practices as teachers and learners are informed by the difference of the digital. We’ll look at how learning and literacy is represented in popular digital-, (or cyber-) culture, and explore how that connects with the visions and initiatives we are seeing unfold in our approaches to digital education.

This course will not be taught via a series of video lectures. Rather, a selection of rich resources will be provided through which you can begin to engage with the themes of the course. While the teachers will be present in the discussion forums and in various other media environments, there will be an emphasis on learner-led group formation, and the use of social media to build personal learning networks and communities of peers. On this course, you will be invited to think critically and creatively about e-learning both as a process and as a topic of study; you will be able to try out new ideas in a supportive environment, and gain fresh perspectives on your own experiences of teaching and learning.  This course is also intended to be an exploration  of the MOOC format itself.  Rather than approaching this course with the expectation of exacting teaching methods or precise learning routines, we invite all participants to collectively experiment with what the MOOC experience might be.

The course assessment will involve you creating your own digital artefact: something that is designed to be experienced digitally, on the web. It will be likely to contain a mixture of text, image, sound, video, links, and can be created in the environment of your choice. The artefact will be a representation of any of the themes encountered during the course, and you‘ll have the opportunity to use digital spaces in new ways to present this work. Our definition of ‘digital artefact’ is intentionally imprecise to invite experimentation and creativity: it will be evaluated via guided peer-assessment.

This course has been developed collaboratively by a team of experienced teachers and researchers in online education, who run the international MSc in Digital Education distance programme at the University of Edinburgh.

(8)Writing for the Web (WriteWeb):

https://www.open2study.com/subjects/writing-for-the-web

Capture the attention of online readers by learning how writing style, web design and structure can keep them engaged.Understanding the difference between writing for print versus writing for the web starts with learning about how readers behave differently online. This subject brings to light how to accommodate the needs of online readers through web design, writing style, structure and search engine optimisation.

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